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Making Super 8 Home Movies – Article by Rebecca, Teen Blogger


It’s the 21st century, sSuper 8 style Camera - photoo any kid has the ability to make an amateur movie with their computer, digital camera or cell phone. I love my digital camera and my laptop, but recently I got a Super 8 home movie camera. My Super 8 camera isn’t digital, it uses film, and it’s a little more difficult to use. If you make a film with it, you have to be careful – a cartridge of Super 8 film can only record up to three minutes, 20 seconds of footage and can’t be deleted. The film is expensive so you can’t just film your cat over and over again or numerous videos that have no meaning. Film isn’t instant, it has to be sent off for developing in a photo lab and to post it anywhere online, you have to have it transferred to digital formats.

To anyone who loves making movies of their everyday lives all the time and uploading them to social media sites, filming in Super 8 might sound like a waste of time, but it’s not. Filming in Super 8 is a really fun way to save the important moments in your life and after getting some practice, it’s eaSuper 8 roll film - photosy to learn how to use a Super 8 camera and run a projector. Digital files, including SD cards, memory sticks and DVDs, all have a lifespan of 25 years or less before they degrade and become unreadable, but film can last over a hundred years if it’s taken care of properly so you don’t have to worry about data corruption or losing unsaved files. Super 8 film has a grainy, nostalgic look and it was sort of the iPhone of its time. It was invented by the Eastman Kodak company in 1965 as an easy way for average people to record and share videos. In the late nineties, digital technology was getting more advanced and many people just packed up their film cameras in their attics and garages and forgot about them. This was bad news to people who loved filming on Super 8 because they were afraid the film format might become obsolete, but lately Super 8 film has been getting popular again. A lot of this has to do with the 2011 movie, Super 8, a fictional movie about a group of kids in 1979 who use a Super 8 camera to enter a film festival, and the 2012 movie, Sinister, also fictional, about a writer who moves into a house and finds a collection of creepy old film reels in the attic.

I love my Super 8 camera and I think if I had to choose between filming with my digital camera or my Super 8 camera, I’d choose Super 8. I just hope that companies keep on making the film so that it won’t become obsolete!

For more information on Super 8 film, see:

Super 8 film: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_8_film

Also, check out these websites:

Eastman Kodak’s history of super 8 film, and the Atlantic Filmmaker’s Cooperative (Halifax).

Rebecca,

Teen Blogger

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