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Ten Blog

The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress - Review by Kyle, Teen Blogger

Posted on 03-Feb-17 16:21
In The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress, author Robert A. Heinlein gives a complex look at revolutionary ideals, their cost, and the reality of conflict between societies. Political ideas on these topics are presented and discussed often throughout the novel, but they are done so in such a way to make it interesting reading, even for those who may disagree. Its well-developed characters and comprehensively detailed setting make it a smart science-fiction tale, with impressively realistic sensibilities.
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Frankenstein - Review by Jenna, Teen Blogger

Posted on 16-Jan-17 13:17
When most people hear the name ‘Frankenstein’, they think of a huge, green monster with bolts in his head that walks around like a zombie. However, the original novel by Mary Shelley is not the story you think it is. It’s not about an evil monster causing havoc for the sake of being evil, nor is it about the task of creating this monster. Frankenstein isn’t even the invention; he is the inventor. The monster that most people think is called Frankenstein is actually a grotesque, nameless, and intelligent being that causes enough empathy in readers to make them believe that the real monster is indeed the scientist who created him.
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Redshirts - Review by Kyle, Teen Blogger

Posted on 10-Dec-16 13:32
Even with its title, Redshirts references cliches of genre-fiction. In the titular case, it is the tendency for (red-clad) Star Trek security officers to die alarmingly often, a technique used by the writers to increase dramatic tension without killing any main characters. Interestingly, it is not with condemnation that John Scalzi writes about these conventions. Quite to the contrary, it is an examination dripping with the writer’s affection towards the source material.
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The Ocean at The End of The Lane - Review by Kyle, Teen Blogger

Posted on 08-Nov-16 09:23
“It all came back and even as it came back I knew it would not be for long: all the things I remembered, sitting on the green bench beside the little pond that Lettie Hempstock had once convinced me was an ocean.” In The Ocean at the End of the Lane, author Neil Gaiman crafts a tale of weird fiction fit to stand with the classics of that genre. He expertly weaves a deeply personal story of childhood and memory within a sinister tale of evil not from our world. The decidedly stark prose gives it a pleasingly sincere quality, a stylistic choice that perfectly underlines the themes of the book. Though a relatively short read, it doesn’t feel stunted in the slightest, and its pacing is excellent. Particular praise should also be given to the characterization, as it has an unshakeably real quality, even amid the fantastical elements of the story.
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The God of Small Things - Review by Saul, Teen Blogger

Posted on 07-Sep-16 08:18
Perhaps one of the strangest, but most interesting novels I have ever read, The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy is a tale filled with emotion. While often books full of real-life issues that take a gritty view on things do not impress me (I usually find they try too hard to be dark), this particular story reads like something that could actually happen. There are enough moments of joy to make the moments of sadness really matter. The majority of the story takes place in Kerala, India in 1969. It tells the tale of an upper class family though the eyes of several different characters, primarily two children.
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Vicious - Review by Becca, Teen Blogger

Posted on 27-Aug-16 12:20
Described in one word, Vicious, by V. E. Schwab, is absolutely thrilling. It’s terrifying and brilliant and beautifully written and horrible, but above all, it’s so incredibly thrilling. The plot was fast-paced and intense, the characters intricate and amazing—the recipe for a perfectly vicious new adult fantasy read. [Discover Catalogue - Vicious] We start off with two students, Eli Cardale and Victor Vale, almost through with their senior year of college. They’re roommates, friends, but above all, rivals. For them, everything is a competition—who has the best grades, who can win over Angie, the bright, pretty engineering student—the list goes on. Right now Eli is winning in all of those categories, and that plants the seeds of resentment, jealousy, and bitterness in their relationship that will seem to drive Victor throughout the novel.
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V for Vendetta: Studying Graphical Novels as Literature - Article by Saul, Teen Blogger

Posted on 13-May-16 12:49
Any high school English course has a reading list: a group of books that all students must read so that they can complete the class. These are usually classics that are considered to be some of the best books ever written. 1984, Brave New World, any Shakespeare play, and many others fall into the category of so-called “high culture reading.” These books are typically old and have themes surrounding society and the human condition. It was surprising to me then, when I found, on my reading list, a graphic novel. It was the widely popular V for Vendetta by Alan Moore and David Lloyd. Now, I don’t need to write a blog post explaining to people that this is a good book to read, as that has been said before in numerous forms, but I did want to talk about what makes a book, and specifically this graphic novel, something that is good to study. I also wanted to talk about how often society looks down on certain mediums as lesser in some way or another...
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The Gunslinger by Stephen King – Review by Saul, Teen Blogger

Posted on 08-Apr-16 15:04
Although King is often known for his chilling horror stories, I believe some of his best work can be found in the fantasy genre. I am part way through this series now (the full series is called The Dark Tower), but thought I would take some time to recommend the first book. The Gunslinger is a novel like no other. It exists in a fantasy universe, but not a Tolkien cliché that many would expect from these types of tales. Instead, King has created a dead world that hints at a past glory and filled it with a wonderful cast of characters that attempt to scrape through life in a harsh landscape. I could best describe it as a fantasy-western. A world in which magic and guns exist as the tools of good and evil...
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As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner - Review by Pranathi, Teen Blogger

Posted on 05-Nov-15 10:49
Fear, pride, motherhood and love were all just empty words to Addie Bundren, just shapes to fill empty spaces. What may have seemed real at first, such as the affection she felt for her husband Hans, had disappeared. To Addie Bundren nothing was right, nobody was pure, and most words were lies. She believed her family had taken her away from her home and that most of her children showed no care for her. With these poisonous thoughts in her mind, she decided her family deserved the worst punishment. William Faulkner, through this novel, tells the story of a woman who lived a bitter life: a life of hate and a life or paranoia which drove her mad...
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A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith – Review by Kaela

Posted on 21-Aug-15 10:45
There were three people who recommended this book to me and all of them couldn’t explain why they liked it so much. Now after reading it, I love it just as much as them only I’ll try to explain why.
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The Road by Cormac McCarthy – Review by Saul, Teen Blogger

Posted on 16-Oct-14 14:17
Summary: A man and his son venture along a road in a post-apocalyptic land. This is a grim story that takes a look at the strength of human spirit in a world that has no hope or happiness.
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Halloween Reads - Review by Anna, Teen Blogger

Posted on 25-Oct-13 09:38
Halloween is here. It’s the time to scare and be scared, but personally, I’m not too fond of being frightened. I have selected two books which fit the Halloween spirit but are more suitable than a Stephen King novel for those who are easily scared.
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Resisting Historical Accuracy by Anna, Teen Blogger

Posted on 10-Dec-12 11:29
REPOST-“Resistance” by Owen Sheers is a war story with a twist. The book is set in an alternate World War Two, a World War Two where the Allies are defeated and Nazi Germany is the victor. It is a setting that gets you to think about how fortunate we were that the outcome of the war was what it was....
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  • Harmony House
  • Burning
  • See no color
  • One of us
  • A tangle of gold
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  • The radiant road
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  • When we collided
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  • Fig
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  • Essential maps for the lost
  • Queen
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  • The Raven King
  • Breakaway
  • The forbidden orchid
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